Altfaiths.com

Seeking Unity in Diversity

Greek Goddess’:The 3 Fates

3 sister deities knows as the Moirai or the Fates  are the daughters of Greek Goddess Nyx, in some versions. In another Zeus and Themis are the parents. Siblings of Hemera, Aether and Hypnos. Their names are Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos.

Clotho: Spins the thread of Mortals lives. She controls whether or not a mortal was born or if a mortal would die along with other similar situations.

Lachesis: She measured the thread of life that her sister spun.  She was in charge of deciding how long a mortal was to live. She was also the decider on what the mortals destines would be.

Atropos: She was in charge of deciding how the mortals would die. She would cut the thread of life and then a mortal would die.

 

The Fates helped defeat the titan Typhon. They forced Aphrodite to sleep with other Gods and restored Pelpos life after it was destroyed by his father. They were fooled by a mortal women who intoxicated all the fates and forced them to help her save her dying husband. They agreed but someone had to take the women’s place. In the end she Sacrificed herself.  It is believed they can control the lives of the Gods with the threads of life except Zeus so he would use that to his advantage to control them.

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/25/greek-goddessthe-3-fates/
Twitter
Pinterest

Cherokee Myth: The Sacred Pipe

pipe_quilledMost all Nations have stories about the ‘Sacred Pipe’. What many people refer to it as The Peace Pipe. Which is an incorrect Hollywood thought shown in the old west movies and cartoons. The Sacred pipe is to the Native Americans as the cross is to christian cultures.

The pipe, in one form or another, has come to most cultures around the world. Every group has used the pipe in one way or another and has stories of how they came to have it. The Lakota tell the story of the White Buffalo woman and how she first brought the pipe to them. Just as the Tsalagi have this story.

It is not important how the pipe first arrived. Or who it came to first as all nations see themselves as the first to have this gift from creator. What is important is that the pipe is revered as a sacred item and also important is that it did come from The Creator. What is most important is that pipe was brought to all men of this world, for we all must share this world. Long ago, but not long after the world was new, a tribe of red skinned people came to live on the lands which are around The Blue Smoke Mountains.

Continue reading

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/25/cherokee-myth-the-sacred-pipe/
Twitter
Pinterest

Example Mabon Ritual

First cleanse yourself (bathing, smudging ect)

cleansing the space:

Using your besom sweeping deosil around your intented space sing or say

father of sun
mother of night
bathe me in your
protective light
from quarter to quarter
and round about,
the Good stays in
and the bad stays out.
safe in this circle
so mote it be,
by earth and air,
Fire and sea.

Open with a grounding meditation for the season-

Then, cast your circle.

Continue reading

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/24/example-mabon-ritual/
Twitter
Pinterest

Review: The English Magick Tarot

box-cover-360x479TWHEnglish Magic Tarot is a deck devised by magician and comic book artist Rex Van Ryn, painter Steve Dooley and Pagan writer and musician Andy Letcher. With a foreword by Chosen Chief of the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids Philip Carr Gomm, the new deck deftly entwines all aspects of English Magic.

As Philip Carr-Gomm states: “With this deck and book, you have the chance to explore the world of English magic directly, engaging with its peculiar charms and eccentricities. And with what excellent guides!”

Drawing on High Magical Traditions represented by organizations such as Order of the Golden Dawn and embodied by the likes of Aleister Crowley, Dion Fortune and Austin Osman Spare, the deck is replete with Hermetic symbolism. It also acknowledges the low magic path of the cunning folk and how the tarot has been used in that tradition. As Andy Letcher notes: “We regard the tarot as a kind of distillation of Western wisdom.”

The deck is set in the Tudor and Stuart periods, beginning with the reign of Henry VIII (although the Tudor period began earlier), through the upheaval of the Stuarts.This was a time of radical change in England.  Read More 

 

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/24/review-the-english-magick-tarot/
Twitter
Pinterest

dragons-6

Chinese dragons

China is a country that is very well known for its array of fascinating mythological creatures. One of the most famous of these creatures is the Chinese Dragon or as sometimes known, the Oriental Dragon. We all know know the image of the dragon from cartoons such as Sleeping Beauty, where Malificent changes herself into a fierce dragon to stop the prince rescuing Aurora, or the grand majestic dragons of BraveHeart. These dragons are large, stocky creatures who fly with enormous wings, with the ability to breath fire from the pit of their belly. These western dragons hail from Germany and are creatures of the element of Earth. They are often shown to be evil, and relentlessly violent, although, these poor guys are likely misunderstood.. Chinese Dragons, however have several differences. These Dragons are portrayed to be benevolent beings, and are friendly, gentle and wise.

Chinese dragons rarely have wings, yet they still retain the ability to fly up into the heavens. They have long, large, but slim bodies, which are snake like, that flow with grace and beauty. They have four or five eagle like claws, but these are not used to hurt. While most dragons had four claws, the imperial dragon had five, and only the Emperor was permitted to use the motif of the Imperial Dragon. Any other using this motif would be severely punished. Many dragons will have a mix of camel like facial features with and almost human like expression in the eyes. They also often posses a beard and they can be of any colour. Their colours often have significant meaning. The have scales of a fish and ears which resemble that of a bovine creature. While the Chinese dragon does not usually have wings, as mentioned before, if they do have wings, such as the case with the winged, or YingLong dragon, their wings will be bat like, scaled and somewhat smaller than the wings of a western dragon. The dragon also has horns that are not unlike that of a stag. Finally, they have four legs.

The colours of each dragon also bear some significance. Blue and Green dragons represent nature, growth, serenity and health. Black and white symbolises the balance of the yin and yang. Yellow and Gold symbolises warmth and reliability. Finally red, the most traditional colour for the Chinese Dragon, represents fortune and happiness.

These dragons, unlike their Germanic counterparts, do not breath fire. Auspicious, magickal powers, co-exist with the gods in heaven. They are the rulers of and have the ability to summon and control water, and unsurprisingly, are very strongly associated with water as an element, and this is shown in many Chinese folklore tales about dragons. In one tale in particular “The Four Dragons”, we hear of four dragons who see that the poor people of China are starving because their crops cannot grow because of drought, and despite the trouble they may bring on themselves, go into the ocean and bring the water into the heavens so that it rains down on the land.

The dragon, much like many mythological creatures throughout a number of cultures, possess the power of shape-shifting and it is said that they can transform themselves into silk worms. The four dragons of the chinese tale mentioned above, finishes with the four dragons, who upon being trapped under mountains for helping the Chinese people by raining water on their land, transform themselves into four rivers. The rivers connected and lead to the four seas, so that the people will always have access to water.

The are symbols of nobility, solemness and holyness. The bring good luck, wealth and help people who are going through hard times or who are in trouble. They are also associated with protection and are thought to repel evil spirits. One of the parts they play in the Chinese New Years parade is to repel the evil spirits so that the new year is prosperous and lucky, rather than being ruined by the doings of evil spirits. With the Chinese Dragon present, this malevolent entities will not even get a chances to cause misfortune.

Dragons have been present in Chinese culture for thousands of years and are considered to be among the deities by many people of China and in other Asian countries. It is thought that they watch protectively over the people, and for this they are beloved. In the Buddhist faith, it is believed that when a Buddhist or Dharma has achieved perfection or enlightenment, that upon their death, they ride to heaven on a dragon. Some Chinese people believed that they were descended from the dragons, especially those born in the year of the dragon.

The people believe there to be fours dragon kings for each of the four seas, the North Sea, the West Sea, the South Sea and the East Sea. Many towns near bodies of waters had a temple dedicated to the appropriate dragon king for that area and they were highly revered. Rituals were held and sacrifices were made to honour these dragons in ceremonies lead the temple officials.

There are nine types of dragon in Chinese mythology and each have their own distinct creatures.

The Huanglong Dragon or the yellow dragon, another dragon who worked closely with a Chinese Emperor, presenting the Emperor Fu Shi with the foundations of writing.

The Winged dragon or Yinglong, was thought to been in servitude to the Yellow Emperor Huang Di, who flew the dragon. When he died, he was depicted as a dragon. The Yinglong is thought to have helped dig rivers and prevent flooding.

The Celestial Dragon or the Tialong are the dragons that reside in heaven They live close to and pull the chariots of the gods despite dragons being considered as deities in their own right.

The Spiritual dragon or the Shenglong brings rain and controls weather to help the people of China, preventing drought and famine.

The Treasure dragon or the FucanglongT guards precious treasures. It is said that they live nderground to protect buried treasures, and that vocanos were created when they burst through the earth to fly to the heavens.

The Panlong or Coiling dragon not ascended to heaven and inhabit lakes.

The Dilong dragon was the protector of rivers and seas and is thought to be the female form of the Shenglong

The Dragon Kings or LongWang live in crystal palaces and are the four dragons who are depicted in the tale mentioned before.

The Jialong or Horned Dragon is considered to be the strongest of all the dragons.

The dragon is present in much of Chinese culture, including the presence of Dragon style fighting in Chinese martial arts, which uses an approach bases on the understanding of movement. The dragon is also seen in Chinese Astrology. It is the fourth sign in the Chinese zodiac and like the other signs, the dragon is assigned to certain years of birth. People who are born under the year of the dragon are thought to be strong, courageous, stubborn and have a lot of drive to succeed. The dragon is also part of four constellations which are thought to watch over the earth, one of whom is the Azure dragon, who is one of four celestial protectors. The others are a tiger, a tortoise and a red bird.

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/24/1397/
Twitter
Pinterest

Greek God Hypnos

God of sleep and sheep. He is the son of Nyx and Erebus. Brother of Hemera, Aether, and the Fates. He is the partner of Pasithea (the deity of hallucination). He is the father of Morpheus ( good dream God), Phobetor (bad dream God), Phantasus (Fake, illusion dream God), and Ikelos (true dream God). He lives in a cave in Hades realm in the underworld. When his mother bring Night to parts of the world he brings the sleep for the living things including other Gods.

In some Greek Stories he is portrayed as a young nice man however, in Hesoids version he is not very nice.  He often portrayed as “a thorn in Zeus’ side.” Hera was angry with Heracles (Hercules) and wanted to do something about him due to Zeus’ affair. Zeus would never allow her to do this and so she needed Zeus out of the way. She asked Hypnos to put Zeus to sleep. When Zeus woke up he went straight to find Hypnos only to find him with his mother Nyx, whom Zeus is intimidated by. He left Hypnos with a warning to never to do it again. However, the temptation was too strong.

He got in trouble with Zeus during the famous Trojan war because Hera decided to get involved and needed Zeus to be distracted. She asked Hypnos to put Zeus to sleep and so he did. He was hesitant to do so but Hera bribed him with things he may want only one he agreed to and that was the marriage to Paisthea. He was turned into a bird by Hera and went to put Zeus to sleep then hid until he was fully asleep. He then went to Posiden and asked him to help the Achaeans because Zeus was asleep. Posiden agreed and the war changed. Zeus never realized what Hypnos had done.

 

 

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/20/greek-god-hypnos/
Twitter
Pinterest

THREE INITIATORY CRAFT TRADITIONS IN THE UK

witchcraft-09

Essentially there are three main forms of initiatory Witchcraft in the UK, the Gardnerian Craft, Alexandrian Craft and Robert Cochrane inspired traditions such as the Clan of Tubal Cain.

Gardnerian Craft began in the late 30’s through to the 50’s. It grew out of the Western Mystery Tradition (with influences from the work of Aleister Crowley and Dion Fortune) via alleged early 20th Century Witches. It is derived from a synthesises of traditional folkloric beliefs about Witches, the traditional year, Margaret Murray’s ‘The Witch cult in Western Europe’,  Leyland’s ‘Aradia Gospel of the Witches’ and the works of the romantic poets and the Western Mystery Tradition.

Gardnerian Craft in Europe tends to be unorthodox with each coven being idiosyncratic in character. This is because each coven is autonomous (as is in Alexandrian Craft), there being no central authority. The emphasis is on practice rather than belief allowing each Witch to have their own interpretation of their experience if the mysteries and what the mythology of the Craft means to them.  Read More

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/19/1383/
Twitter
Pinterest

Mabon

autumn-leaves-wallpaper-6

Autumn Equinox is the second in the trilogy of harvest festivals. Mabon marks the completion of the grain harvest begun during Lughnasadh.

At Mabon, The Mother of the Harvest becomes the Old One, the wise grandmother who teaches us to rest after our labors.

Celebrations revolve around the gathering of crops and thanksgiving, and rituals to insure the success of next year’s harvest .The making of corn dollies from the last sheaf of corn that is harvested is a typical custom. The dolly is kept until the spring – keeping the spirit of the corn, when she is ploughed back into the field to breath the life of the corn back into the soil.

A harvest supper, also known as a harvest home, a dinner of thanksgiving and celebration, is also traditional

It is a time of great joy and great sorrow, it is the time of great change. Mabon is as much about life as it is about death, it is the reminder that within life there is death and within death there is life. It is about the dance that partners life with death.
Mabon is a time when we are poised between the worlds of life and death, of light and dark, of day and night. We mourn that which is passing, celebrate that which is bountiful and are reminded that the Mother will hold the seed of Light in Her womb until the time of rebirth. Once more the realization that the Wheel of Year has turned, as it always has and always will: as our time is circular not linear, there is no end without new beginnings, it is the cycle of life eternal.

For the second time in the year, day and night are once again equal, creating for us the time to look at our own scales, the bounty of our own personal harvest weighed against our life’s experience.
Its a  time to take the gifts given from experience hard wrought, make them apart of who and what we are. These past experiences, regenerate into wisdom. By doing so we honor these events, people, and experiences that have so impacted our journey, our being, and in honoring these we make them sacred and their passage one of distinction and consequence.

For we can not know what we have not experienced. The journey of life is one of knowledge, and through that knowledge, growth.

As the sun crosses the equator and heads south, he signals the end of summer’s impassioned days and the beginning of the journey into the quiet winter months. We celebrate the story of Mabon an Modron, ” the son of the mother”, the Divine Youth, the Son of Light.

Mabon, who is the son of modron was stolen away when he was 3 days old to prevent his light from shining on the earth. He dwells in the Earth Mother’s womb, the Otherworld. It is a place of challenge, a place of cultivation, a place where one is renewed and regenerated, a place of new life. So that He maybe reborn, the source of Light and Joy, the champion of His Mother. Just as Life is being drawn into the earth as seed, accumulating strength and wisdom, to become the new harvest, Mabon has returned to his Mother’s womb. For as the winter begins, the earth incubates the tender seeds, throughout the winter, the seeds are kept deep within Her womb so that they may be reborn and bring forth new life.

It is during Mabon that we are reminded of the necessity for fallow periods, for it is the fallow periods which allow us to assimilate, regenerate, and incorporate that which we have progressed through. Just as fields need to lay fallow to better support new growth so do we.

For in life events happen, choices are made, and actions generated, we cannot go back and change that which has passed, but we can reap the harvest of wisdom these have brought us.

A blessed Mabon to you all

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/19/mabon-3/
Twitter
Pinterest

Mabon Visualization

autumn_picnic_by_macgabhain-d329l14Close your eyes: its dusk and your sitting in a meadow of full of fall flowers: goldenrod, pearly everlasting, butterfly bush, and fireweed. Brittle tan grasses wave in the breeze; low to the earth, clover heads bob gently. The smell of your campfire burning low fills you, and the warmth of the fire washes over you, as its waning light makes the long shadows dance a little faster.

As you watch, the sun drops on the horizon, breaks, and evaporates; the focus of the light is gone, all that’s left is an echo, of pale-gold light against which, the trees rise black. To either side, you feel the arms of the forest encircling you. the light from your waning fire letting go. Under their branches, trailing to earth, the pine trees hold darkness, nights coming. The darkness beckons you, safe, protective, and a little melancholy.

Continue reading

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/18/mabon-visualization-2/
Twitter
Pinterest

Mabon

A Quick Short Summary of Mabon 🙂

 

Mabon

 

At the beginning of Fall,

 

The second harvest calls

 

It’s a day where light and darkness come together

 

And make balance as light as a feather

 

It’s a time to look back on your past

 

Since life goes by so fast

 

It is time for the animals and plants to prepare for winter

 

The Sun God goes to the one who loves him

 

Until he returns again

 

Until then enjoy this Mabon

 

 

Facebook
Google+
http://altfaiths.com/2016/09/17/mabon-2/
Twitter
Pinterest
« Older posts

© 2016 Altfaiths.com

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
Skip to toolbar